FERC Authorizes Pipeline Facilities Expansion

Additions to Rover Pipeline will deliver up to 1.45 Bcf/d of Appalachian natural gas to Michigan and Canada

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) announced it has approved a portion of Rover Pipeline, LLC’s (Rover) request to place key facilities associated with Phase 2 of the Rover pipeline project into service.

In addition to compressor station and mainline facilities, the filing also requested permission to place the Vector meter station in Livingston County, Mich., into service, as well as the new pipeline market segment connecting that meter station to the Defiance, Ohio, compressor station. While FERC granted approval to Rover to commence service of Compressor Station 3 (CS3) and a portion of the mainline between Compressor Stations 2 (CS2) and CS3, FERC is still evaluating the new market segment, the Defiance, Ohio compressor station, and the Vector meter station. These facilities, when completed, will improve the ability to deliver natural gas produced in the Appalachian Basin to Michigan and Canadian markets.

The new facilities will allow delivery of up to 1.45 Bcf/d of natural gas produced in the Appalachian Basin to local distribution companies and underground storage fields throughout Michigan as well as to Enbridge’s Dawn storage hub in Ontario, Canada.

Rover is a greenfield interstate natural gas pipeline that is being constructed by Energy Transfer Partners in multiple phases. When construction is complete — currently estimated for the second quarter of this year — Rover will be capable of delivering up to 3.25 Bcf/d of natural gas, with up to 68% for distribution to markets across the United States via the ANR Westrick and Panhandle Falcon delivery points and the remaining 32% for delivery to Michigan and Ontario, Canada, markets via the Vector pipeline. According to Rover, 83% of the horizontal directional drilling and 99% of the construction for the project are complete.

Rover is one of several pipeline projects intended to increase the takeaway capacity for natural gas produced in the Appalachian Basin.

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